10 Ways to Wean Your Child Off the Pacifier

Is your child attached to his pacifier? How do you get rid of the pacifier, especially during bedtimes?

Weaning your baby or toddler off the pacifier may not be as easy as it seems. A child who is so attached to his pacifier will rant and rave for it, for hours. Here are some tips and tricks to help your child get over the pacifier.

  1. Cold Turkey

    Going cold turkey may sound very ruthless. You have to expect a lot of crying if you decide to use this strategy. Parents will have to stay strong and true to their decision of not giving the pacifier. You must not give in! Give the child a few days to about two weeks to adjust without them.

  2. Dip In Coffee

    Make the pacifier undesirable. My parents tried this on me when I was young. They made a cup of strong, black coffee and dipped my pacifier in it. They left the dark-tinged pacifier for me to find. When I put it in my mouth, I spit it out immediately because of the strong taste. Apparently I did not want it anymore. They tried it on my sister but coffee did not work, so they used some other stronger stuff so that my sister would reject her pacifier. Try out something bitter but harmless to the child.

  3. Feed a Muffin After Milk

    I tried this method on my daughter. Since we often give milk to her before her nap and going to bed at night, we decided to change the routine a bit. We gave her a small muffin or biscuits to eat after her milk. The act of chewing is similar to the sucking of the pacifier, making her drowsy. Make sure you brush her teeth as soon as she gets drowsy and ready for bed.

  4. Cut the Pacifier

    This method seems to work miraculously for some parents. Cut a tiny piece off the end of the pacifier and tell your child that it doesn’t work anymore. They may not want it anymore after discovering that it is “spoilt”. Some children may be comforted with the pacifier physically in the mouth, but not having to suck them. For these kids, gradually cut more tiny pieces off the pacifier until there is nothing left for them to hold in the mouth.A variation of the above method would be to poke a tiny hole at the end of the pacifier. Having pacifiers that does not work anymore may frustrate the kids and soon they will let it go.

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  1. My son is going to be 12 months old on the 26th of this month, i would like to wean him off of it now so he wont have it any longer then he should have it. i’m not sure of what i should do to subitute it with instead. I know he still really young but i have seen 3 year olds still sucking on there pacifiers and i don’t want my child still having that pacifier at that age, that is insane. IF you can e-mail me some helpful information on that i would appreciate it. thanks

  2. Just out of curiosity, why it so INSANE for a 3 year-old to have a pacifier? One of the most important lessons to learn as a parent is that ALL kids are different. Some are mature emotionally, while others are not. While it may be unnecessary (not INSANE) for some 3 year-olds to have pacifiers, it may be necessary for other kids to have them at that age. If you create hard rules for your children – without sensitivity to each child’s emotional needs – you are going to miss the mark.

    At the same time, you do have to draw the line sometimes, regardless of the individuality of the child, but be sure you are doing it for the right reasons. “I don’t want my child still having that pacifier at that age” is NOT a good reason, by itself. Just because you don’t want it, doesn’t mean it is the right decision. Just make sure you have some reasonable justification – usually having to do with your child’s best interest. I’m not saying that your not wanting your kid to have a pacifier at that age isn’t in your kid’s best interest – just that there should be some good reason for it.

  3. I agree, it is ridiculous to have a paci at 3. It is indicative of a permissive parent. It is no good for their teeth and has become a “habit” by age 3 (even sooner)- these are facts & have nothing to do with “emotional maturity”. Also, and not for every child, it could lead to more ear infections.

    When I see a child with a paci at 3, I don’t think “Oh every child is different”, I think, that parent was not willing to put up with the difficult task of taking it away. I would much rather see the child holding a “lovey” at that age. That may be comforting to the child and has more to do with their emotions that a paci -which is a HABIT not an emotional need.

  4. Don’t be so quick to judge. I have taken the binki away twice now. The first time for a month. I would catch her putting her baby sisters in her mouth but that was it. One night after her crying for two hours we gave her a binki and she fell asleep in two minutes. We then removed the binki from her mouth. How are you suppose to take it away completely when baby sister has one.

  5. With our two year old, we took his soothers this Christmas and put them in a gift bag to give to Santa as a thank you for his presents. We’ve had a couple of tough nights sleep-wise, but he doesn’t ask for them at all.

  6. I think it is best not to judge anyone. You can tell I have an older kid with a pacifier by that comment! Hey I made a mistake, I’m a wimp and he’s a manipulater. He turns 3 tomorrow and I have told him no more so we are going cold turkey. I also have a one year old that was also a heavy pacifier user. I took it away from him and he never even looked for it. I thought it best to take them both away at the same time. The sooner you do it the better though while they are very young. You live and you learn, that is what parenting is all about, so I certainly don’t judge others by mistakes they make.

  7. My daughter is 18 months and she was semi weaned off the paci, she only needed it at night to sleep and in car rides, well when daddy left for Iraq, the paci became like a drug for her…she has to have it ALL THE TIME, but this started only after he left for Iraq, so I am hoping when he returns she wont need it..ugh!!

  8. My 2 1/2 year old twins are still addicted to their pacifiers. I brought it up with my pediatrician, and she said it is absolutely nothing to be concerned about. She said we are much harsher here than other countries, and some kids need that comfort longer than others. She said it doesn’t become a dental issue until 4 or 5 years old.

  9. I used the book from #8 “The binky baba fairy” and it worked! My son was so excited for the fairys visit! You can get the book at http://www.binkyfairyandmore.com

  10. My daughter turned three 4 days ago so we “quit” cold turkey. We made a big deal out of the process by letting her actually cut them up herself. She loves to cut things with scissors and she was excited to cut them up and throw them away! We told her since she was 3 now that she couldn’t have them anymore. It has worked great. I have not tried before now to take it from her, I just felt like she was finally ready. It hasn’t been as tough as I though it would be. She asked me the first night if she had cut ALL of them to which I answered “yes”, end of conversation, she got in her bed and went right to sleep.

    Having a pacifier at three is not indicative of a permissive mother. My daughter had one up till the day she turned three but I didn’t let her have it all the time. I quit letting her have it out in public by the age of two because of judgmental people and their rude comments. She learned to leave it in her carseat when we went somewhere and she was happy when we got back in the car and it was there. While I don’t feel that it is an emotional need for a toddler to have one, it is a comfort, just like a “lovey” blanket, stuffed animal, breast or bottle to other kids. I don’t feel that it is a habit, it is a comfort. Let them be little while they are, they grow so quickly that this will soon enough be a thing of the past.

  11. Any advice for this situation?

    My beautiful step-daughter is almost 4 years old and only with us part time (every other weekend). Her mother provides her with free access to the pacifier 24/7, despite our request to begin weaning her (we can’t do it on our own as we have her so infrequently). We have her down to just at night and on long car trips.

    None of the above tricks will work because, for example, if we told her it was broken, she found it tasted bad, or a fairy came to take it, she is now old enough to know there are more at the store.

    What do we do?

  12. my issue with weaning is that i do not have the full support of my family… the thing is i know my son doesn’t NEED it. He doesn’t take it with him to the daycare…. and he is there from 8am to 5pm….. but the minute he walks thru the door he asks for it… when he was a baby my parents and i agreed if he was old enough to ask for it then we would discuss weaning… it is a comfort to him though so now i am in the process of trying to find other coping mechanisms for him.. he is in the terrible two’s stage and “paci” seems to be the only thing to cool the temper tantrums…..
    any advice??

  13. I work at a day care and there are 3 and 4 year olds that still suck on pacifiers and some even bottles. I’m sorry but I think that is too old to be drinking bottles and sucking on pacifiers. I have a 18 month old that always has to have her pacifier and I’m wanting to wean her now while still young. I don’t really think badly of parents who have older kids who suck pacifiers but I think over 2 years old is way too old to be doing that. Maybe the parents don’t have the patience for it because a lot of kids cry when you take it… I don’t know. I do think the sooner the better and I think Cold Turkey is the best way to go.

  14. I think its gross for 3-4 year olds to be walking around with bottles and pacifiers..Its horrible for their teeth and shows how lazy the mother is. Yeah I’m one of those rude people that make comments when I see kids with pacifiers and bottles. GROSS

  15. My 2 1/2 year old son threw his paci away in the garbage after we had talked about doing so a few days before. The first night of not having the paci, i reminded him that we had thrown it away and he cried but he stopped asking for it. It was very difficult for him to fall asleep that night so i offered to massage his back (patting it gently). He hasn’t asked for it ever since but now he wants me to message his back so he can fall asleep and he cries endlessly if i don’t do so. He is also waking up at night calling for me. What do i do?

  16. Great posts! Regarding the binky, my friend absolutly raved about the cut method, and the psychology behind it. She emailed me a link to a site that has a free publication (supported by advertisements). Very cool stuff, worked like a charm for me as well; wouldn’t do it any other way. The link is http://www.bye-bye-binky.com for anyone who is interrested. If you do, let me know your thoughts… Bella

  17. I once heard about a couple who simply nailed the pacifier to the wall, and when the kid wanted it, that’s where he had to stand to use it. I believe it worked really well!

  18. Judgemental freaks! I guess I’m one of the “lazy” moms. My first daughter was off the paci by 1 year, but my 2.5 year old still takes one. we’ve made two attempts, but she is really really tough. i was on bedrest from Sept-Oct, then again from dec-march. we had many changes happen including moving her into a toddler bed, moving her into a new room to share with her older sister, potty training her, and bringing home a new baby. i was resting for three months before the baby came and we had to decide what was most imprtant to us-getting rid of the paci did not make the list. i think my daughter was asked to deal with a lot of changes in a short amount of time and i didn’t think taking away something familiar and comforting at that time was the right thing to do. if that makes me lazy, well, bring on the bon bons and potato chips!

  19. I love “lazy” moms comment!!! Every child is going to be different my daughter was not potty trained till she was 3 and I did work with her on that since she was 2 she just had to do it herself. We are currently working on the paci issue but for all you poeple who say oh my god thats gross maybe you should just concentrate on your own children and let the rest of us be the kind of parents we want to be. Its nasty rude people like you who should keep your thoughts to yourself!

  20. 1 of all 5 is way to old to suck a bink. My cousin Madison is almost three and she has problems! Everytime my baby sister and I go up there she wants to eat her baby food,she also sucks a bink 24/7 im going to use dip in coffe without anyone knowing.plus my aunt made 2 attemps to get her off but she cant deal with the crying.Today I asked my aunt when is maddy going to get off the pacifier?and she said’when she chooses.like who would let their 3 year old choose when she’s going to get of the bink? She gets me so mad.Also she is so dumb she’ll come up to me and take my homework,crinkle it,and hide it. and she only sucks it mostly when her mom is around plus, she doesn’t really even suck it.Today i cut off one of the bink tops and her mother started going buzerk after she asked me to. jees

  21. Obviuosly aly123 is a child herself and doesn’t have a child to understand what she is even talkng about. I also agree with “lazy” mom. I was going to start weaning my 16 month old son off the paci, but am deciding to wait because he will be going through alot of changes with us moving into a new home, him getting his own room, and he is going to need that comfort of his paci. those of you who criticize moms for their children still needing the paci at an older age are ignorant. every child is different and and some need the comfort of a paci to go through changes more than others. In a perfct world my son would be off the paci by now, but it’s not and we are in the middle of going through alot of changes so he needs something to comfort him and that right now is his paci, as well as it is for other children who happen to be 3 or 4 years old. So i guess I am a “lazy” mom too for caring about my son and wanting to keep something constant and comforting for my son in our changing life right now.

  22. I too agree with most posts here. Its absolutely unacceptable for a child to have a pacifier past the age of two, and agree that its lazy parenting! Its very bad for their teeth, way before ages 4 and 5, and its more of a habit than it is comfort when your child passes age 2. I have a 16 month old daughter who is attached at the hip with her binky, but just because she is doesnt mean that i should postpone the weaning process. I dont know what parenting is like for all mothers out there, but i do know that parenting relies on the parent. When you say, oh i just couldnt wean at 18 months or 24 months or because you have a new baby that always has a binky, its not because your kid cant handle it emotionally, its because the parents dont have the time and patience to handle the process! No and time-outs go a long way when your kids dont listen or obey. Im not saying that you should put your child in time out for wanting their binky but come on buck up. If you dont want them to have a binky its you thats gonna make sure they dont have the binky at WHATEVER age! Timing is everything, they might not get it, but you dont cave…. children all learn at a different rate, weaning is no different, it may take longer for some, and even longer for some others. All im saying is that Parents need to parent, and all the other stuff in between is just that…. stuff!!!

  23. After reading all of the comments i feel that most of you are just outright uneducated buttholes!! I have a degree in child psychology and if you dont know that means that i have a phd you cant have anything less to be an actual child psychologist. Anyway studies have shown the children who have there pacifiers taken away to soon have problems later on and that its not necessarily a emotional issue as it is a comfort but like a few parents above have said if the child is going through stresses at home such as a new baby coming, moving, getting a big kid bed anything like that can affect the child leading him to hold on to what he has to comfort him some kids it is a pacifier or a blanket or a doll etc.. taking away there comfort when they have such things going on can in the end cause emotional problem with the child separation anxiety and such things i believe as a licensed professional that all of you people who have problem with it really should seek therapy yourself for underlying issues and i honestly believe you are stuck up and rude and your children will resent you in the future and my son got rid of his “binky” at 18 months but only because he was ready to!

  24. Sara, I love your reply :) You said it: they will do it when they are ready. And for all you freaks out there calling other parents lazy, parenting is not about power–yes, you CAN take away the pacifier, but being a parent is like being an educator, you have to facilitate the process, you have to teach them how to come to that decision themselves even not forcefully take it away. At the end you will either have to spend money on therapy or on braces—I vote for braces!

  25. I think it’s no ones business what age a child should stop using a pacifier. If someone came up to me and said it’s GROSS, I would tell them to shut the hell up and worry about their own ugly children.

  26. I love Sara’s reply. I have a son who turned 3 in December and yes he still takes the paci before his naps and at bedtime. We kept thinking he would just give it up himself since he weaned himself off the bottle around 12 months, but since it worked and we had no one telling us how horrible it was for him we stuck with it. We thought he would be off of it by now, however, we moved to a new house AND had a new baby at the end of August, so we thought that it would be a bad idea to try it during all those traumatic changed. He had a VERY difficult time adjusting to the move and baby and if we’d have taken his paci it would have been worse. And, one month ago we finally go him to start sleeping in his own bed, which by the way works so well because he is still using the paci, so I think I would be crazy to take it away from him right now. Every kid is different and I prefer to gradually introduce my son to changes. He is not gonna be on it till he goes to school or anything! And he only used it a few times a day, so what is the harm in that. What would it matter whether he was using a binkie, or a stuffed animal? He would still be using something as a crutch to get to sleep. And he does not keep it in his mouth all night. It falls out and he stays asleep. So in my opinion, we are so caught up in all these “rules” for our children these days. Let them be little

  27. I have made so many attempts to remove a dummy from my 3 year old son, without success.It is making him speak with a lisp. I have tried different ways and nothing seems to work. As for peoples nasty comments check yourself before judging others, noone is perfect.

  28. Sara, thank you for your reply, and everyone else’ reply that was not a negative attack. My son is almost 40 months old and still takes a paci at bed time only. I have tried to talk him into ditching it but, he is not ready. I do not consider myself a lazy parent. My son was going poop in the potty at 22 months and was completely potty trained at 28 months. My son says yes please, and no thank you. He was speaking sentences by the time he was 13 months old through sign language, in which we learned, and then taught him. He has the cognitive skill level of a four year old, and speaks better than a four year old. We did not get there by being lazy! I for one choose my battles wisely. I have spoken with the dentist, he has no problem with it. It is “gross” to me to think that there are such narrow minded people out there, that have nothing better to do, than to worry about how long my son wants to suck on a pacifier. Seriously, find something real to be grossed out about!!

  29. My daughter is 2 1/2 years old and i am trying to wean her off the pacifier but had no such look yet .Going to try some of the suggestions in other posts . I have not found motherhood easy since the birth of my daughter ,and may i just say that its people like some of the ones above that put pressure on parents to constantly do the right thing .One of the things i have learnt about being a mum is that no one is perfect and u deal with things differently because you know youre child.People are so quick to judge and it really annoys me because who is to say whats right and wrong !!!!!!!

  30. I probably would never have given Ava a pacifier to begin with but she was born a little sick and her biggest comfort was sucking so the paci was the best way. Now she’s 14 months and uses it only at bedtime (if it is in her sight during the day she’ll put it in her mouth but she doesn’t need it so I don’t give it) I am basically trying to get her off the bedtime routine with it. It wasn’t hard getting her used to it for bed but now I notice her front teeth have grown in funny. I think I’m ready to try the cutting method. I’m just worried about her teeth growing in wrong

  31. I am in the process of weaning my 2 1/2 year old off his \\\”choochie.\\\” His pediatrician never fussed at me for him still using it, but swore by the cut method when the time came. This morning I decided it was time, entirely because I am sick of looking for the damn thing when it gets lost three times a day, and it\\\’s gross because he spits it out all the time and it ends up on every kind of floor.

    So this morning, on the sly, I cut a v-shape into the tip. He took one suck, took it out and looked at it, took another suck, then told me it was broken. I tried to fix it with a screwdriver. He tried it a few more times and now won\\\’t have anything to do with it. Suprisingly he was very matter of fact about the whole thing. I thought he\\\’d be more pissed. I have been in wonderment all day.

    Except, he wouldn\\\’t take a nap, and had a really hard time falling asleep. Worse, he woke up and cried inconsolably for like 20 minutes. So now I feel horrible. He never asked for choochie though.

    And that one post has me worried that I\\\’m damaging him emotionally. Probably he\\\’ll figure out how to sleep. But his grandfather was just commenting today how secure he seems so I hope I haven\\\’t undone all of that.

    People that would make a judgmental comment to a stranger in public about their child are completely rude and misguided.

  32. We had successfuly gotten rid of the pacifier when my son was 18 months old. It was very easy, we snipped a little hole in one of them and he noticed it as soon as he put it in his mouth, we told him that it was broken and that he would have to put it in the garbage, which he did himself, and after that we had about a week of him asking for it at bed time but didn’t give in (we had put the other 7 soothers away because we knew we would need them with our second child wich whom I was already pregnant with) he cried for a few nights but we just had to remind him that it was broken and that he had thrown it away.

    All was good when our daughter was born. (They are two years apart in age) He didn’t even remember that he used to suck on soothers or that they were previously his. He did not try to take her soothers away… untill now! Our daughter is now 10 months old, and all of a sudden our son (who is almost 3) has beed secretly stealing and hidding her soothers so that he can go suck on them! It seems like we’ve tried everything to get him to stop doing this, almost to the point were I thought I’d wean our daughter off, but I think she is just not ready to do that.

    Does anybody have any suggestions?

  33. while i agree that a child at the age of 3 shouldnt have a pacifier,there are always other circumstances.my daughter is 20 months and has a “nunu” she loves it and talks to it like its her friend,i desperately want to take it away,but she also holds her breath when she gets angry and will pass out and even go into a seizure. i would love to go at it cold turkey but….i cant so, if anyone has advice…I NEED IT!! has anyone tried cutting the nipple? how id it work?

  34. Hey!

    My daughter is 3 years old, i seek for help in this website.
    In the same very night after i read this forum, i took her pacifier and grab the scissors and made few holes on it, not only one or two.. like a dozen of them all over the pacifier, she was crying in bed for it, so i said “here it is, i found it.. good night” she put it on her mouth and started to make funny faces and i asked her “whats wrong” and she said “its broken, have big holes on it. i don’t want it” and i said “there is no other pacifier, that’s your only one”, i waked away and let her stay with the broken pacifier. she’s not happy with it, but she isn’t crying either, so i suppose it did the job, or eventually will, otherwise i am gonna cut a bigger piece out of it for tomorrow night, and the day after, until there is nothing left of it.

    Sounds mean, and i do feel guilty, but i’m doing it for her, its time to give it up..

  35. is the “nunu” the pacifier or some sort of cuddly toy? i was reading your post and got confused.

    if it is the pacifier, try the same i just did to my 3y old.

  36. Here i am again..

    the step “4. Cutting the Pacifier” really worked out for me, i wean my 3y old daughter off her “duddie” in just two nights, today was her 3rd night and she didn’t even ask or cry for it.

    As i have said before, in the 1st night, i cut a few V shapes of her pacifier and all over it, the 2nd night when she asked for her “duddie”, i cut a bigger piece in the front (big enough to the point my tomb fits on it) and put it on her mouth so she wouldn’t notice that it had been cut,
    afterward she said it had a big hole and that she didn’t wanted it anymore because it was broken, and to trow it in the bin,
    so i talk to her and explain that, it was her only “duddie” and from now on she will have to sleep without it like big girls and we agreed to exchange the “broken duddie” for a 2nd teddy to cuddly and sleep with.

    For me it really did the job, my daughter was used to sleep with her teddy, cloth and “duddie” every single night.
    Wasn’t expecting the wean process to be so fast, no crying and no complaints after.

    Note:
    For those who are going to take this step, make sure that your child isn’t watching you cutting it,
    it is going to be the only Pacifier your child is gonna see,
    and you might wanna keep it for the first week before you trow it away,
    so if your child ask for it, you can still show him/her that it is still broken,
    if he/she does, remember your child how you had agreed to take a cuddly toy in exchange for the broken pacifier.
    (i had to do it in the 2nd night and it work just fine for me)

    Good Luck
    And hope my experience with my daughter may be help to others. =)

  37. I just have to reply to Sara. Are you seriously claiming to have a phd in child psychology when you can’t even use proper grammar? Also, very professional to tell a bunch of perfect strangers that their children will resent them just because you think they’re being rude… you must be a wonderful counselor with that type of objective and positive approach to people with differing opinions.

    Amazing that you have so much schooling, but can’t seem to write well. Isn’t that sort of a necessary skill in your field?

    Here’s a quick grammar lesson for you.

    It should be “their pacifiers”, not “there pacifiers”; “too soon”, not “to soon”; “it’s not”, not “its not”; “an emotional issue”, not “a emotional issue”; . “their comfort”, not “there comfort”… You see, “their” is possessive, and “there” is refering to a place. “It’s” is what we use for “it is”, “its” is possessive, etc. Oh, and you really should learn how to use proper punctuation, too, while you’re at it.

    So, as amusing as it was to see you pretend to be so much more educated than the other posters on here (strangely they all write better than you do…), next time you plan to lie about your profession you may want to type your comment into Word and use their spell/grammar check.

    Oh yeah… I just called it. You, miss, are a liar and are not a “licensed professional”. Give me a break. You don’t even lie WELL.

    And I agree that 3 years old is too old for a pacifier.

  38. Dee . . . my thoughts exactly (regarding Sara’s post)! Very pathetic.

  39. This article was terrific! Another great tip is to use PACIFIER MAN of http://www.pacifierman.com. Your child is sure to be weaned of his pacifiers by Pacifier Man’s teachings. It worked for my child!

  40. My first child threw his paci out at 18 months my second, a girl, is another story. Like so many other kids- she goes to daycare and lives without it all day but the second she walks in the house she wants her “dodo”. She is a screamer, slapper, pincher and literally she wears us down until she gets it.

    You know what I think is so darn funny… all you people that think its so “gross” that some toddlers still have pacifers are the same darn people who shoot me dirty looks and make comments when I am somewhere with my 28 month old daughter and I DONT have her pacifer and she is screaming bloody hell! Its so gross until my kid is screaming in the grocery store or on the bus than your like shut that kid up.

  41. Oh my gosh pacimom, you hit it dead on there. my 2 year old son is the same way; he will scream bite, smash his head on the floor, anything he can do so yes, I give in.
    I know he doesn’t NEED it, but he’s teething, and potty training and that is a lot for a little person. I will cut the tip though when he is ready. My older son just decided one day that he didn’t need it anymore and threw it away. I think maybe sometimes you have to plant the seed and be patient.

  42. my daughter just turned 2 in April, she still has her paci, she dont use it during the day she only needs it when she goes to sleep. when she is sleeping it falls out and she dont put it back in her mouth. and i dont think that having a paci over the age of 3 isnt that bad, some say that it isnt good for their teeth. but if you would look on some packages it says its orthadontist approved. and i agree with pacimom, people shoot these looks at you when your child is having a tantrum in public just because they want their paci and some wants the parents to keep them quiet, but its you people who think so negativily about them having one at 3 that dont like hearing them having tantrums in public..so if you dont like them having tantrums, put up with seeing them with paci’s in their mouth,, and KEEP YOUR COMMENTS TO YOURSELF!

  43. My thougts exactly Dee. I do have a degree in psychology and, for those of you who don’t know, that does not mean I have a phd. Having a degree means you completed a three or four year undergraduate degree. Seems to me that someone with a Phd would know that.

    I have done a bit of looking in Psychology journals since first reading this page and I have yet to find any studies which indicate taking a pacifier away from a child causes any long term issues – emotional or otherwise.

    I have a four month old who depends upon a pacifier to sleep. I regret having given it to her to begin with. I, personally, don’t believe there is any reason for a child that is two years of age or older to depend upon a paci. I wouldn’t go so far as to call it gross or to say that the parents are lazy. We all have different opinions and beliefs and we all, for the most part, have our child’s best interests in mind.

    We plan to wean our daughter off of her “choochie” when she is six months. Who knows, it may not go as planned.

  44. I AM ABSOLUTLEY DISGUSTED AFTER READING THE COMMENTS ON THIS WEBSITE- I THOUGHT THESE FORUMS WERE SUPPOSED TO PROVIDE MUMS WITH HELP AND GUIDANCE-TO TRY AND HELP AND SUPPORT ONE ANOTHER-SOME OF WHICH MAY HAVE LITTLE FAMILY AND NEED EXTRA GUIDANCE!!! TO BE HONEST IT SOUNDS LIKE A FACEBOOK BITCHY CHAT SHOW!!! GROW UP!! GOOD ON THE ONES THAT HAVE GIVEN VALID POINTS/IDEAS TO THOSE THAT NEEDED IT-

    OH AND ALSO A BAD PARENT IS ONE THAT NEGLECTS THEIR CHILD/ABUSES/MISTREATS THEM- NOT ONE WITH A CHILD DUMMY!!! YOU MUST ALL LIVE SUCH PERFECT LIVES?? DOUBTFUL

    I RECENTLY HEARD THAT YOU COULD GET INTO TROUBLE WITH SOCIAL SERVICES IF YOUR CHILD HAS A DUMMY AT 3-SO I CONTACTED THEM AND ALSO THE HEALTH VISITOR/DENTIST/DOCTORS AND THEY LAUGHED AND TOLD ME IT IS PERFECTLY NORMAL….. I THINK IF WE REWIND MANY YEARS YOU MAY RECALL SEEING SOME CHILDREN WITH THERES TILL THEY WERE 6 SOMETIMES 7…. PERHAPS AS A RESULT THESE CHILDREN ARE NOW IN PRISON?? LOL

    MY ADVISE-YOU KNOW YOUR OWN CHILDREN SO DO IT WHEN YOU FEEL THEY ARE READY SEEKING CONSTRUCTIVE ADVISE-PERHAPS NOT ON HERE!!

  45. My daughter will be 3 in a month. She was born with severe medical complications. She does not hear, speak, trached and her communication is just having “tantrums”. The only comfort she has is the pacifier. I don’t really want to take it away, but i don’t think I really have a choice in the matter. her top 2 teeth have really started sticking way out. I’m trying the suggestion of cutting the pacifier. Because her sight isn’t the best, she won’t know what happened. I hope it works because nothing else has. I’ll try to replace the paci with a teddy or something only because I know she needs some kind of extra comfort.
    I’m not a lazy mom either. I work very hard taking care of a preschooler, special needs toddler, and infant. I am also a culinary student, and help my husband manage our business.

  46. My sister and I both used the cut method on our toddlers (23 mos.+) with great success — off the binky in less than a week. You can read about the day-by-day progress of my daughter’s “debinkification” at MushBrain.net. It was not an easy week and we’re just now settling into solid sleep again (2 weeks later), but overall I think it was a rather painless way to take on this dreaded task.

  47. My biggest problem with the binki is that I have seen it retard language skills in several children (I work with kids). If they always have a binki in, they don’t babble as much, and they learn to talk around the binki. Its not fine. They talk less, later and with more problems. At least in many of the kids I have seen. I think its good to try and explore other ways of comforting kids.

  48. I am an early childhood educator/parent educator. The best time to wean is as early as possible. No 18 month old or older needs a pacifier. It hinders their speech. Any method is ok, but do not LET them decide then it will never happen. Take some control. They will get over it. I told my son the fairy took them away one night for all the NEW babies and that he was too old; not a baby anymore. He was ok, no therapy and no braces. He is an A+ student in college now.

  49. OK, I’m back. The children learn to comfort themselves. The pacifier is artificial comfort. This is kind of like when you rock a kid to sleep; they never learn to fall asleep on their own. A lot of times it is the mom who has a harder time getting rid of the thing than the child. Do your child a favor and show them how to comfort themselves or let them discover it on their own. They don’t NEED it. Their world will not come to an end.

  50. ok well how bout my son is 3 ans his father up and left at 2 after he knew who his dad was and wanted him around and 2 my son its something thats not going2 up and left so im wrong 2 give my son a bobo 2 go 2 sleep bc hes 3 i think you should slap yourself 4 talking about other parents and how they are with there kids and there bobos

  51. Well wish me luck… I’m going to attempt the cold turkey method but failing that I have already cut a V in the evil little piece of rubber! I am two weeks away from having my second baby and really want my 2 1/2 year old son to be without the soother. It probably wouldn’t be such an issue if when he lost it in the middle of the night he didn’t scream bloody murder till I come find it. I’m simply not going to be able to handle two kids getting up in the night right away and hope desperately for success soon! He only has it at night and at nap time (for me) but when he is with his sitter he doesn’t have it at all so I know he doesn’t “need” it. I’m just a sucker.

  52. If you think that its ‘gross’ for a 3 year old to have a dummy then dont let ‘your’ 3 year old have. My 2.5 year old has a dummy to sleep with, settles within minites and sleeps 11-12 hours at night and a 2 hour nap at day. Am I lazy… probably, but I have twin boys aged 8 months who keep me busy enough without having my toddler waking at night for something that makes her feel safe and relaxed (gee what a crime it is to let your kids have something that makes them feel like that). She is happy and well adjusted and only a ‘little’ girl..seriously people relax I am in no hurry for my gorgeous kids to grow up any quicker than they already do..and for the record, one of my twin boys has a dummy and the other doesnt need it…so yes all kids are different, even identical ones. I also agree with Busy Working Mum, I come on here to get practical advice and see that I am normal and not the only one experiencing some of the most difficult times of my life. Not to see good intentioned mothers be ridiculed for doing what makes life easy in thier own houses. And if my post is riddled with spelling mistakes then for that I am sorry, but, thanks to my 2 gorgeous boys I had about 4 hours sleep last night. Come on mums let stick up for each other.. who else understands like another mum

  53. I\’ve done a lot of research as to whether or not to let my daughter even have a soother at all. What I found out is children who use them have a significantly lower rate of SIDS in children under 2 than in those who don\’t. Also, sucking your thumb is FAR worse for teeth than a soother. They are made out of non abrasive, conforming materials that do NOT affect the teeth they way people on here are claiming. I do agree that having a soother after the age of 2 can hinder speech development and I am hoping to have my daughter off of them by her 2nd birthday, she is 21 months now. That being said, I know my daughter. No one else does. I know what she is and is not ready for and if trying to wean her off causes more stress and hardship for her than is necessary than all you critics out there can call me a lazy mom too. Kids are pushed way too hard these days and I\’m not going to torture my daughter by withholding something she loves dearly if she is truly no ready for it. My best advice is follow your own instincts. Give it a try and if it doesn\’t go well, then maybe wait and try it again a little later. I wish people wouldn\’t be so critical of others parenting skills. I bet if we look deep down into each critics lives there are \’technics\’ being used that we could tear them a \’new one\’ about.

  54. My 17 month old loves her binky. I\’m eager to try the cutting method. She is not old enough to tell me \”It\’s broken\” or \”I don\’t want it\” but hopefully it will go well. Thanks for all the constructive tips for successfully getting rid of it. Boy there sure is a lot of drama and haters on here!

  55. I have got twins and they turned 2 on septemeber and beleive it or not I was always so concerned but my sister lives with us and she has a son 2 years old who doesn’t take paci. She has one son and she is way more exhasted then I m. Just like Kristy’s kids, my twins sleep 11 hours of night time sleep and 2 hours during the day time. My poor sister’s son sleeps well during night time but wakes up early in the morning and his naps are only half an hour. Its not like they are sucking on the the paci 24/7, I mean just for 5 to 10 minutes during the day time so they can go to sleep and then bed time for 5 to 10 minutes. But the draw back is that some nights one of my girls want her binki and wouldn’t let me take it away, specially when she is sick. Common, I think its totally ok for kids to have their paci until they are ready. We are moms and we know how hard it is to raise kids plus specially if you have twins or more them 1 kid then go for it, there is not harm in it. I am moving soon and talked to my girls about their binkies and they keep on saying that they will garbage it when we move to our new house so lets hope for the best but overall you will know when you kids are ready. It doesn’t effect their teeth, their language, or there are no concerns at all. Plus I even discussed this matter with a few pediatrician and they said it was totally ok. SO ALL YOU HARD WORKING MOMs no worries.

  56. Everyone must keep in mind that each child is different. Some children may have a sensory deficit that will require them to have the feedback from the pacifier. I am currently try to wean my one year old off of the pacifier and it is difficult especially when I go to school full time and have clinicals so I have family watch him. I know that no one should judge others because you have no idea what the case is. I did watch a 3 y/o who did not need the passi and would not give it up, at that point you can say these parents do not want to deal with him being fussy. Remember we are all adults and you should not judge someone else’s parenting methods because you are not their parent.

  57. Everyone must keep in mind that each child is different. Some children may have a sensory deficit that will require them to have the feedback from the pacifier. I am currently try to wean my one year old off of the pacifier and it is difficult especially when I go to school full time and have clinicals so I have family watch him. I know that no one should judge others because you have no idea what the case is. I did watch a 3 y/o who did not need the passi and would not give it up, at that point you can say these parents do not want to deal with him being fussy. Remember we are all adults and you should not judge someone else\’s parenting methods because you are not their parent.

  58. Everyone must keep in mind that each child is different. Some children may have a sensory deficit that will require them to have the feedback from the pacifier. I am currently try to wean my one year old off of the pacifier and it is difficult especially when I go to school full time and have clinicals so I have family watch him. I know that no one should judge others because you have no idea what the case is. I did watch a 3 y/o who did not need the passi and would not give it up, at that point you can say these parents do not want to deal with him being fussy. Remember we are all adults and you should not judge someone else\\\’s parenting methods because you are not their parent.

  59. My daughter will be 3 next month. She was only taking her pappy when she was sleeping or in the car, however, I am pregnant with number 2 and the bigger I get the more she seems to need her pappy. She is a very smart little girl, who has had many changes in her 3 years. We have moved 4 times for my husband\’s job and now a new baby is coming and a possible move. I can tell you I get all kinds of comments. I just think that all kids are different and some need the comfort longer than others. It does not make me lazy. It makes me intutitve toward my child\’s needs and sensitive to our situation. We are going to start talking about only having the pappy during sleep times again, in hopes to wean from the pappy completely, but we will see.

  60. Reading these comments I was interested to know how many of your children still using pacifiers over 3 years of age have speech problems? Especially considering the research into how they affect the childs ability to correctly produce sounds. Having worked with a lot of children who have speech problems it’s amazing how many of these are attributed to over use of a pacifier. The ablility not to produce sounds properly can affect a child’s ability in learning to read and write. It’s not just an emotional issue! Can’t recommend highly enough that you get rid of them asap

  61. Because pacifers are disgusting as is thumb sucking or little rags to suck on. They r no longer babies!

  62. OH MY GOD!!!
    What is the problem with a pacifier????? My son is 3 and his speech is perfect, his teeth are fine and he is way ahead in his development! I love the way that it is so bad to have a pacifier but fine to have a comforter or even suck thumbs!!! Ok lets cut off the thumbs of any child still sucking it after 2 LOL!!! I remember seeing girls sucking their thumb at high school but funnily enough never saw a single one with a pacifier!!! FUNNY THAT!!!?????? Get over yourselves all of you women who think they are mum of the year!

  63. I would really like to wean my 18-month-old off his pacifier, to the point that I’m offering a prize on my blog to anyone who comes up with a suggestion that works for us (and doesn’t result in my son having a meltdown).

    Here is the link for those interested.
    http://8poundpreemie.blogspot.com/2011/01/addiction-that-really-sucks.html

  64. We are taking away pacifiers from our babies, who are almost 6 months old. I just had to call 911 because our daughter had turned her pacifier around in her mouth, lodging it firmly in the gums. They were able to get it out, and she didn’t choke on it thankfully but I do not EVER want to have that experience again with her or our son. We went cold turkey and no more pacifiers. She was our pacifier junkie, but she’s tolerating the transition so far very well, much to our surprise.

    I am a SAHM and I do watch our babies BUT I do have to get up to go to the bathroom, to make their food, etc. so it’s not because I’m a neglectful parent that this happened. The pacifiers are choking hazards. Or, even if they don’t like our daughter, it isn’t pretty to see your child with their mouth forced open with this pacifier jammed in there and all she can do is cry until the 911 medics can get there because I couldn’t get the pacifier dislodged from her mouth. If you can wean your baby from a pacifier, consider it a blessing.

    The issue with pacifiers over age 3 isn’t permissive parenting but, from what I’ve read, that it could ruin their permanent teeth.

  65. We used the bribery/big ceremony method to get my son off the pacifier. It worked.

    It’s a long story, but my son is now pacifier-free. Check the link for details as to how we did it.

    http://8poundpreemie.blogspot.com/2011/02/its-funny-how-good-you-can-feel-about.html

  66. i ahve a 5 year old son who takes a binki and a sippy cup.. he lives two weeks with me then two weeks with dad. im not a lazy mom and im trying to break both the habbits. but the whole time hes here he cries for the binki and the cup so i give him the cup.. his dad refuses to break him.. what can i do to get him to understand the binki and cup are not for big boys.. hes been potty trained since he was almost two…wahts some good advice to get him on track with the age appropriate things.

  67. I have a 3 year old that uses a pacifier. I am not a lazy parent in the least. My childs pacifier happens to be his “lovey” it comforts him. It is not a habit. I believe it is wrong of people to judge others. All children are different. I am not a permissive parent. I am actually kind of tough on my child. And I think it is highly ignorant of people to judge others before looking at what “mistakes” they themselves make. Just thought I would point that out.

  68. I disagree 110% on ripping the paci away just because you don’t want to be embarrassed or talked about by others to see your child with a paci pass the age of 18 months. I believe that some parents take the paci away because of their own insecurities and power struggles that they have in their own lives. Some parents think they have a point to prove to themselves and others, so that they don’t appear to be weak, controlled, and lazy parents that are manipulated by their small children. Some parents follow the same parenting styles of their parents, which may not have been the best way and others follow the way others have raised their children. What might work for someone else, doesn’t necessarily mean that it will work for you. For example,say you had four children in your home, ever child has their own personality, discipling each child would probably be different because what might work for one may not work for the other! GOD does not create everyone exactly the same for his own reasons!!!!!!!!!!

  69. I disagree 110% on ripping the paci away just because you don\’t want to be embarrassed or talked about by others to see your child with a paci pass the age of 18 months. I believe that some parents take the paci away because of their own insecurities and power struggles that they have in their own lives. Some parents think they have a point to prove to themselves and others, so that they don\’t appear to be weak, controlled, and lazy parents that are manipulated by their small children. Some parents follow the same parenting styles of their parents, which may not have been the best way and others follow the way others have raised their children. What might work for someone else, doesn\’t necessarily mean that it will work for you. For example,say you had four children in your home, ever child has their own personality, discipling each child would probably be different because what might work for one may not work for the other! GOD does not create everyone exactly the same for his own reasons!!!!!!!!!!

  70. I work as a pre-school teacher and I must say the use of the dummy seems to be distinctively linked to a lack of parental education. The children who are still using dummies at the age of two and onwards are just about always the product of poorly educated parents. The dummy most definitely effects speech development but this could also be because parents don’t spend time educating their children – too much time in front of the TV! Children should be spending their day giggling, chatting and playing – not sucking! Furthermore, it seems to go hand-in-hand with badly behaved children as the parents again seem to have given up on discipline as it takes time and energy. Please do your kids a favour and ditch the dummy early!

  71. My daughter is one and still has a pacifier but only for sleeping. I dont see it as a problem yet. At the moment she still has reflux issues and is cutting some big teeth so Im going to let her keep it for now but when I do decide to wean her off I am going to try this method… http://www.bye-bye-binky.com

  72. Wow, you lot are harsh ! I’m 12 and I still have a pacifier, but I have really bad anger issues and I found myself punching Walls and just about everything (not people) and I tried everything but a pacifier was the only thing that worked I only have it when I’m angry and all my friends know and they excepted it and so did my teachers I have it lots in class no one seems to mind at all the boys say it’s cute, so I don’t think it’s a problem.

  73. My son had his paci till about 2 weeks ago and he will be 5 in two months! haha. It was his idea to get rid of it and he got a gift from the paci fairy. No damage to his teeth according to our dentist so I worried for nothing letting him have it to get to sleep that long. I think we all just need to relax about it. I also gave him a bottle a few times after we took the paci away just so he could suck on something (I can hear all of you gasping!) But I don’t care cuz I do what works for me and my child! And no he is not hooked on the bottle again, it was just a gradual process, which my son needed.

  74. AND THOSE PARENTS NEED 2 NAIL THEMSELVES TO THE WALL!….(STUPID ASSES)

  75. I\’m wondering if all you people who are bashing parents who allow their children a pacifier have some mental problems. You are downright viscious! Maybe you need a pacifier yourself, seeing as how you turned out pretty rotten! I\’m just wondering, did you have a paci as a child? And if you did, can you please tell me when you stopped sucking on it? Because I want to do the OPPOSITE. My worst nightmare would be for my sweet, kind children to end up complete jerks like you!
    As for the paci, it\’s one of the toughest things to do, and you need to feel it out and make sure your child is ready. We told our daughter that soon she will have to give the paci to a new baby that needs it. Told her this for a few weeks so she was comfortable with the idea. Then we got a box and put her paci in it, wrapped it up and gave it to the postman. She got a big reward for being a big girl and we made the day very special, reassuring her she was so big. It wasn\’t easy, but eventually she accepted that she no longer needed a paci. Good luck and remember that you are the one who ultimately know what\’s best for your child.

  76. I\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’m wondering if all you people who are bashing parents who allow their children a pacifier have some mental problems. You are downright viscious! Maybe you need a pacifier yourself, seeing as how you turned out pretty rotten! I\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’m just wondering, did you have a paci as a child? And if you did, can you please tell me when you stopped sucking on it? Because I want to do the OPPOSITE. My worst nightmare would be for my sweet, kind children to end up complete jerks like you!
    As for the paci, it\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’s one of the toughest things to do, and you need to feel it out and make sure your child is ready. We told our daughter that soon she will have to give the paci to a new baby that needs it. Told her this for a few weeks so she was comfortable with the idea. Then we got a box and put her paci in it, wrapped it up and gave it to the postman. She got a big reward for being a big girl and we made the day very special, reassuring her she was so big. It wasn\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’t easy, but eventually she accepted that she no longer needed a paci. Good luck and remember that you are the one who ultimately know what\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’s best for your child.

  77. So I noticed that there are no comments after Ashley’s post…which is actually surprising given the meanness in a lot of what is being said…but after reading what she had to say about her child being deaf & more I can’t imagine that it’s THAT important to take her paci…a child like that may very well have needs that no one, maybe not even her parents, could know. I have a daughter that is DD-she weighed 1 lb 14 1/2 ozs. and cried constantly if her paci got lost until we found it or bought another. She decided when she wanted to give it up. She is 28 now…Now I am grandmother to twin girls who just turned 2 a few days ago; they are living with me because their mother-my other child, died from cancer 2 months ago. What cruel person would judge them for still needing their paci’s after that? They cry for her…its a process & I’m not letting anyone tell me when it needs to be done…i think they will tell me when they’re ready-if a DD CHILD KNOWS-THEN ANY CHILD SHOULD KNOW!

  78. My son held on to his binky like it was a lifeline! We actually started out by only giving it to him during naps and when he was real fussy, but as time went on, he seemed to want it more (it went from a suckle need, to a want). My mom found the bye bye binky method ( http://www.bye-bye-binky.com ), printed it and suggested that we go with it. At first I was a bit mad at my mom, but I soon got over it. The method worked amazingly well. My son stopped sucking on it after 4 days! He proceeded to carry it around for another week, but never put it in his mouth. He then got tired of carrying it and simply lost interest. Mom was right, it worked, highly recommended!

  79. My son held on to his binky like it was a lifeline! We actually started out by only giving it to him during naps and when he was real fussy, but as time went on, he seemed to want it more (it went from a suckle need, to a want). My mom found the bye bye binky method ( http://www.bye-bye-binky.com ), printed it and suggested that we go with it. At first I was a bit mad at my mom, but I soon got over it. The method worked amazingly well. My son stopped sucking on it after 4 days! He proceeded to carry it around for another week, but never put it in his mouth. He then got tired of carrying it and simply lost interest. Mom was right, it worked, highly recommended!

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